Cal State San Bernardino

Faculty News

  • Brian Levin: In America, hate speech rightly is free speech
    Brian Levin, director of Cal State San Bernardino's Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, wrote an opinion piece about the aftermath after an attack on the Muhammad Art Exhibit & Contest in Texas on May 3.
    "What makes Geller a hate provocateur is not her criticism of the real violence perpetrated by some Muslim extremists, like the ones who violently attacked her venue, but her homogeneous vitriol that unrelentingly paints Islam as evil, along with any who authentically adhere to it," Levin wrote. "As someone once said, 'A half-truth is the most cowardly of lies.'"
    Levin also wrote: "As thoroughly disgusting and hurtful as I may find Geller's views to be, she is totally correct that neither governments nor bullets nor bombs should block access to her ignorance or our right to publicly repudiate it -or perhaps even ignore it - for the hate that it is."
    Levin was also quoted in an article about the death of a former Southern California resident who became a terrorist.
    Adam Gadahn, who grew up on a remote goat farm in Riverside County and converted to radical Islam in Orange County, was a precursor to the current wave of Westerners joining terror groups. On April 23, U.S. officials announced that Gadahn was killed in January by a CIA drone strike in Pakistan.
    "Gadahn's treasonous descent into al-Qaida's lair presaged a troubling trend of what is now a continuous chain of restless Western youth's embrace of overseas radicalism," Levin said.
    In March, Levin was interviewed about the Tunisia national museum attack. At the time of the interview, no group had come forward to claim credit for the attack that killed at least 20 people, and Levin was asked who he thought might be behind it. Levin also said the aftermath of the attack could affect Tunisia's economy, which relies on tourism.
    The original article was published March 19, 2015.
    Brian Levin, also discussed the death of an African American man found hanging from a tree in rural Mississippi on March 19.
    Levin wrote: "While there has been no determination at all about whether the death is even a criminal act, let alone what motive may exist if it is, such a horrific scene strikes a deep emotional chord in a state and nation traumatized by a lengthy history of racial violence perpetrated by lynch mobs against African-Americans. While urging caution National Urban League President Marc Morial told CNN, 'We need to get all the facts...[as] the method used here reminds us of one of the most heinous periods in American life.'"
  • CSUSB professor collaborates with former colleague on study about creativity and relationships
    Kelly Campbell, a Cal State San Bernardino associate professor of psychology, collaborated with former CSUSB colleague James Kaufman on a study about creativity and how it may enhance romantic relationships. Kaufman is now a professor of education psychology at the University of Connecticut.
    An expert in love and relationships, Campbell says those who engage in daily creativity in their relationships keep the passion alive. The Campbell-Kaufman study can be found online at "Do You Pursue Your Heart or Your Art? Creativity, Personality, and Love."
  • The poison of ethnic federalism in Ethiopia's body politic
    In his weekly column, Cal State San Bernardino political science professor Alemayehu G. Mariam wrote that Ethiopia's 1994 constitution " is designed to create a perpetual disunion, among the Ethiopian people by dividing and corralling them like cattle into insular "nations and nationalities." By segregating the people of Ethiopia into communal, linguistic, cultural and regional groups, the T-TPLF (Thugtatorship of the Tigrean Peoples Liberation) put a constitutional scheme in place that would permanently and irreversibly destroy the social glue of tolerance, harmony and understanding that has kept them united as a people for millennia."
  • CSUSB political science instructor comments on proposed California Fair Pay Act
    Christina Villegas, a professor of political science at CSUSB, is quoted in an article about how the proposed California Fair Pay Act could benefit Latinas who work in Silicon Valley.
    The California Fair Pay Act - Senate Bill 358 - would require employers to pay equal wages to women doing comparable work of male colleagues, and strengthen workers' rights to openly discuss with employers the salaries of coworkers. Please see the entire article here.
  • Inland Empire Chinese immigration topic for talk by CSUSB history professor
    Cherstin Lyon, associate professor of history at Cal State San Bernardino, offered a talk about the history of Chinese immigration in the Inland Empire on 7 at the San Bernardino Historical Society.
    Lyon has been working with Riverside's Save Our Chinatown Committee and students from CSUSB, funded by the university's Office of Community Engagement to research the lives of Chinese immigrants who lived and worked in and around San Bernardino, Redlands, and Riverside.
  • CSUSB assistant professor Kevin Grisham interviewed by BBC on killing of 21 Coptic Christians in Libya by Islamic State
    Kevin Grisham, assistant professor of geography and environmental studies at Cal State San Bernardino, is interviewed by the BBC on Egypt's military reaction to the killing of 21 Coptic Christians in Libya by the radical Islamic State earlier this month.
    A video showing the execution was posted on the Internet on Feb. 15. Soon after, Egypt launched a military air attack against Islamic State targets in Libya in retaliation for the killings.
    The interview can be viewed at "Dr. Kevin Grisham ISIS and Egyptian Bombing February 16 2015."
    CSUSB assistant professor Kevin Grisham interviewed by BBC on killing of 21 Coptic Christians in Libya by Islamic State.
  • John Reitzel, CSUSB criminal justice assistant professor quoted in article examining impact of Virginia's decision to abolish parole
    John Reitzel, an assistant professor of criminal justice at Cal State San Bernardino, is quoted in an article examining whether former Virginia Gov. George Allen's plan to abolish parole worked.
  • CSUSB political science instructor comments on proposed California Fair Pay Act
    Christina Villegas, who teaches political science at California State University, San Bernardino, is quoted in an article about how the proposed California Fair Pay Act could benefit Latinas who work in Silicon Valley.
    The California Fair Pay Act - Senate Bill 358 - would require employers to pay equal wages to women doing comparable work of male colleagues, and strengthen workers' rights to openly discuss with employers the salaries of coworkers.
  • CSUSB criminology professor interviewed about video of suspect beaten by deputies
    Stephen Tibbetts, a Cal State San Bernardino criminology professor, is quoted in an article about the video of San Bernardino County sheriff's deputies shown kicking and beating a suspect.
    Tibbetts said he was initially apprehensive about watching the video, shot by a KNBC news helicopter crew on April 9 over Apple Valley, but that he would eventually for work purposes.
    Sheriff John McMahon placed 10 deputies on paid leave and immediately ordered an internal and criminal investigation of the incident.
    Use of body cameras by officers have positive benefits, CSUSB professor says
    Stephen Tibbetts, a criminology professor at Cal State San Bernardino, is quoted in an article about the benefits of law enforcement officers using body cameras.
    In the wake of the April 9 arrest in which an Apple Valley man was beaten, the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department is committed to developing and implementing a program to outfit deputies with body cameras.
    Tibbetts said data presented to date shows that body cameras do in fact have a significant impact on reducing the number of citizen complaints against police. He cited Rialto Police Chief William "Tony" Farrar's study in Rialto as the best example. But there are other challenges, Tibbetts said, including privacy rights of bystanders, witnesses and victims.
  • CSUSB graduate receives faculty award at Kentucky college
    Doug Pruitt, a Cal State San Bernardino graduate, was one of six people recognized for their work at West Kentucky Community and Technical College.
    Pruitt, a psychology professor at WKCTC, received the Phelps Award, named in memory of Finis Sargent Phelps and Florence Grubbs Phelps, and established at the college in 1991. The award honors faculty who emphasize quality and promote academic excellence, and rewards competence in teaching in the liberal arts and sciences disciplines, the newspaper reported.
    Pruitt joined the WKCTC faculty in 2001. He earned his bachelor's and master's degrees from CSUSB.
    The article was published May 1, 2015. Read the complete article at "WKCTC honors faculty, staff at awards reception."
  • CSUSB political science professor comments on latest Riverside County voter registration data
    Brian Janiskee, professor and chair of the political science department at Cal State San Bernardino, is quoted in an article about the latest voter registration and political party numbers in Riverside County.
    Voter registration data compiled by the California Secretary of State shows that Republicans have the upper hand in Riverside County, but pockets of Democrats are starting to emerge, the newspaper reported.
    Given Democrats' dominance in California since World War II, "it is not surprising that we find areas within the state that were once Republican bastions slowly turning more Democratic," Janiskee said. The article was published May 4, 2015.